Grand Slam Rules and 3-code violation fine for Serena Williams #Sportslaw

Recently, American professional tennis player Serena Williams fined by Grand Slam Board with  $17,000 for 3-code violation during women US Open in New york. It all happened during her record tying 24th major title where she failed to Naomi Osaka following the game penalty after the 3-code violation of Grand Slam Rules in the second set of the final.

During the second set, at first chair umpire Carlos Ramos noticed Serena Williams coach Patrick Mourtoglou giving her instructions through hand gestures in order to communicate to her during the game. As per 2018 Official Grand Slam rules and code, giving instructions or coaching even during the warm up is not allowed. It resulted in infraction of the rule/code irrelevant of the fact that Serena whether understood it or not the act of coach falls into the category of violation under Article III (L), which says;

(L) COACHING AND COACHES

Players shall not receive coaching during a match (including the warm-up). Communications of any kind, audible or visible, between a player and a coach may be construed as coaching. Players shall also prohibit their coaches (1) from using audible obscenity within the precincts of the tournament site, (2) from making obscene gestures of any kind within the precincts of the tournament site, (3) from verbally abusing any official, opponent, spectator or other person within the precincts of the tournament site, (4) from physically abusing any official, opponent, spectator or other person within the precincts of the tournament site and (5) from giving, making, issuing, authorising or endorsing any public statement within the precincts of the tournament site having, or designed to have, an effect prejudicial or detrimental to the best interests of the tournament and/or of the officiating thereof. Violation of this Section shall subject a player to a fine up to $20,000 for each violation. In addition, if such violation occurs during a match (including the warmup), the player shall be penalised in accordance with the Point Penalty Schedule hereinafter set forth. In circumstances that are flagrant and particularly injurious to the success of a tournament, or are singularly egregious, the Referee may order the Coach to be removed from the site of a match or the precincts of the tournament site and upon his failure to comply with such order may declare an immediate default of such player.

Chair umpire Carlos gave her warning by noted it as a FIRST OFFENSE of the match. In effect of the resentment due to warning and losing the game Williams smashed her racket on the court in frustration and anger which an automatic violation of code and it was the SECOND OFFENSE as per the Grand Slam Rules which resulted in point penalty. As if now, getting a simple warning was not a big deal on the court but another incident worked as a catalyst to bring the things on the worst phase of the game. According to Article III (O), it says;

(O) ABUSE OF RACQUETS OR EQUIPMENT

Players shall not violently or with anger hit, kick or throw a racquet or other equipment within the precincts of the tournament site.  Violation of this Section shall subject a player to a fine up to $20,000 for each violation. In addition, if such violation occurs during a match (including the warmup), the player shall be penalised in accordance with the Point Penalty Schedule hereinafter set forth. For the purposes of this Rule, abuse of racquets or equipment is defined as intentionally and violently destroying or damaging racquets or equipment or intentionally and violently hitting the net, court, umpire’s chair or other fixture during a match out of anger or frustration.

After point penalty in the second offense, Serena lost her cool and yelled at chair umpire that he owe an apology to her, he steal her point and called him “thief”. This moment raised the THIRD OFFENSE and full game penalty. According to Article III (P), it says:

(P) VERBAL ABUSE

 Players shall not at any time directly or indirectly verbally abuse any official, opponent, sponsor, spectator or other person within the precincts of the tournament site.  Violation of this section shall subject a player to a fine up to $20,000 for each violation. In addition, if such violation occurs during a match (including the warmup), the player shall be penalised in accordance with the Point Penalty Schedule hereinafter set forth. In circumstances that are flagrant and particularly injurious to the success of a tournament, or are singularly egregious, a single violation of this Section shall also constitute the Major Offence of “Aggravated Behaviour” and shall be subject to the additional penalties hereinafter set forth. For the purposes of this Rule, verbal abuse is defined as a statement about an official, opponent, sponsor, spectator or other person that implies dishonesty or is derogatory, insulting or otherwise abusive.

Williams was fined a total of $17,000, that included $4,000 for a coaching violation, $3,000 for racket abuse and $10,000 for verbal abuse towards the umpire.

ARTICLE III (S) says about the point penalty schedule as follows…

(S) POINT PENALTY SCHEDULE

The Point Penalty Schedule to be used for violations set forth above is as follows:

FIRST offence WARNING

SECOND offence POINT PENALTY

THIRD AND EACH SUBSEQUENT offence GAME PENALTY

However, after the third Code Violation, the Referee in consultation with the Grand Slam Chief of Supervisors shall determine whether each subsequent offence shall constitute a default.

 

Always the on site decision is based on question of fact or question of tennis law which is defined in Grand Slam Rules as…

ARTICLE 1 (U) ON-SITE DECISIONS AND APPEALS

1. Questions of Fact

A Question of Fact is defined as an issue relating to what actually occurred during a specific instance. Questions of Fact arising during a match shall be determined by the on-court officials for that match and such determinations are binding on the players and Referee.

A player may request verification by the Chair Umpire of a call or other determination of fact on a point-ending call made by an on-court official.

The request, verification and resumption of play must all be completed within the twenty-five (25) seconds allowed between points, unless the Chair Umpire determines that an extension is necessary. If an extension is granted it shall be concluded with the announcement “Let’s Play”.

a. Player Appeal A player may never appeal a determination on a Question of Fact to the Referee.

b. Overrule The Chair Umpire may overrule a Line Umpire only in the case of a clear mistake by the Line Umpire and only if the overrule is made promptly after the mistake is made.

i. Clear Mistake It is difficult to define a “Clear Mistake” any more precisely. As a matter of practice the Chair Umpire must be in a position to make a determination that a call was erroneous beyond any reasonable doubt. Chair Umpires should never make an overrule on a ball that is a close call. As a practical matter, to overrule a ball determined “good” by a Line Umpire, the Chair Umpire must have been able to see a space between the ball and the line. Likewise to overrule an “Out” or “Fault” call by a Line Umpire, the Chair Umpire must have seen the ball hit on or inside the line.

ii. Promptly The Rules of Tennis requires in addition to a “Clear Mistake” that the Chair Umpire must overrule promptly, i.e. immediately after the Line Umpire makes the Clear Mistake. The overrule call must be made almost simultaneously with the Clear Mistake of the Line Umpire. A Chair Umpire may never make an overrule as a result of a protest or appeal by a player. A Line Umpire may never change a call as a result of a protest or appeal by the player.

2. Questions of Tennis Law

A Question of Tennis Law is defined as an issue relating to the construction and application of specified facts of these Grand Slam Rules, Grand Slam Code of Conduct and/or the Rules of Tennis. During a match, Questions of Tennis Law shall first be determined by the Chair Umpire. If the Chair Umpire is uncertain or if a player appeals from his determination, then the decision shall be made by the Referee. The decision of the Referee in consultation with the Grand Slam Chief of Supervisors shall be final and nonappealable.

a. Player Appeal Players shall have the right to appeal against any ruling of Tennis Law in accordance with the procedures hereinafter set forth. When a player is of the opinion that a ruling by the Chair Umpire on a matter of Tennis Law is incorrect, he may appeal the ruling by notification to the Chair Umpire in a professional and non-abusive manner. Thereupon, the Chair Umpire shall turn off all microphones in the area of the Chair and immediately call for the Referee. Upon his arrival the Chair Umpire shall state all the facts of the incident and the Referee shall be bound by the facts as so determined and stated. Then the Chair Umpire shall state his ruling on the applicable Tennis Law and the player shall state his position with respect to such ruling. The Referee shall review briefly the applicable rules with the player and the Chair Umpire and either affirm or reverse the ruling. Thereafter, play shall be resumed upon the statement by the Referee “Let’s play” and the players must proceed to commence play. Every effort should be made to determine such an appeal within as quickly as possible and upon the statement “Let’s play” the twenty-five (25) second clock shall commence.



You can read the complete PDF of grand slam rules by clicking the link below :-

grand slam rule book

 



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